How to develop a successful board game concept

Ok, well the big question is how do you develop a board game design concept and have a good chance of it getting accepted by a toy company?

Well… there are several issues to contend with, I will cover each one in turn.

• color

• design

• playability

Color – board game color is a very important aspect of board game design, develop a board that looks terrible and no-one will buy it, except your Mother and closest friends of course. Or use a color that doesn’t match the theme example, pink for a beer game and no real sales will result.

It is great if you have color matching skills, but it is a good idea to seek out someone who does before manufacturing begins, otherwise expensive mistakes could result.

Design – is another important area to develop, get this wrong and it’s profits and hard work down the drain. It has to be done right, so apart from doing the preliminary designs yourself, the finished work should be done by an expert.

Which is another reason why you should, (in my opinion) go through a toy company rather than do it yourself, unless you are a professional graphic artist of course. You won’t have to cough up for an expensive graphic artist if you go through a company, although you will still have to help with design ideas in the initial development.

You can always, (if you want to do it yourself) go to your local college, etc and talk to a student who wants to be a graphic artist when they finish. It is more than likely that they will be sufficiently skilled to produce quality work for you for free in exchange for a percentage of the profits when you get it, (your board game) into the stores, or internet, etc.

Playability – Playability is another important aspect of board game design that should be taken into account. If the game ends quickly then it won’t sell that well. If it takes forever to finish, same thing. But if it can be played for at least 1 to 2 hours, (2 preferably) then playability is great.

Playability also covers, playing pieces, although standard pieces are the safest way to go, and the cheapest. And how technical the concept is; usually if the customer can’t grasp your game within 30 seconds they might go to the next game and buy that instead, although as a game like Monopoly shows other elements can override this.

Playability can also cover the board itself, a relatively small board that doesn’t fold up, will be more desirable to customers than one that will eventually fall apart because it folds up or is excessively large, Squatter, etc.

There are numerous other elements, but these are some of the main ones, take note of these, and you will have a better chance than normal!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *